“Recursion” by Blake Crouch – Abandoned at 10%

A mis-buy on my part.
An intriguing premise but written in a way I struggled to engage with

I pre-ordered Blake Crouch’s “Recursion” because I thought the premise, the emergence of a disease labelled False Memory Syndrome was intriguing. I also wanted to give Blake Crouch another try. I didn’t get on well with his “Pines” trilogy, opting out after the first book. Given the reviews his books get, I wanted to see what I was missing.

The premise is an intriguing one: in 2008, a well-intentioned and heavily funded scientist sets out to save the world from Alzheimer’s and ends up creating a technology that will undermine our whole sense of who we are. Ten years later, a New York City Robbery Division Detective with a tragic history and a drinking problem is present at the suicide of a woman suffering from False Memory Syndrome. He starts to research the phenomenon and can’t let it go.

With a premise like that, I should be happily hip-deep in a mystery /thriller with some cool science at its heart rather than writing a review of a book I’ve abandoned at the 10% mark.

I abandoned the book because of a number of small things that, when I added them together, told me I wasn’t looking forward to spending another ten hours with this book.

The plot structure, with the two asynchronous but converging timelines is a nice idea but the delivery is dull and the pace is slow.

The NYC cop didn’t interest me. He’s a fully-loaded cliché: late middle-aged white man, divorced, the tragic death of his daughter has broken him and his marriage, lives alone, drinks too much and is married to the job. Are you bored yet? I was. There was nothing distinctive about the man to make me care whether he’s going to get involved in hunting down the cause of False Memory Syndrome or not.

The scientist is a mirror image, thirty-eight-year-old scientist, still seeking funding for her big idea, nothing in her life but her work which is in part a crusade to help her mother who is suffering from Alzheimer’s.

Then there’s the memory science, which seems to model human memory as if it where computer memory only on a larger scale in terms of data set size and complexity. My understanding is that memory doesn’t work like that. It’s not a tape we play, it’s something we reconstruct each time we recall something.

Setting the science aside, how these characters remember things doesn’t match my experience. They seem to be watching 4K HD TV while I’m tuned to the radio.

So I’m putting this one down as a mis-buy and sending it back to audible.

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